Culture, Curation, Contribution, Collaboration: The 4 Cs for Future Learning Organizations

Posted by Tom Kupetis on

  You Say “Evolution,”  I Say “Disruption” Thousands of articles have been written in the last few years about the changes that are happening to learning within organizations. Some refer to those changes as ‘disruption’ while others call it ‘evolution’, but whether it is positive or negative everyone agrees that it has come quickly and

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An Agile Approach to Learning Strategy

Posted by Tom Kupetis on

Do your executives cringe when you mention learning strategy? Are you continually trying to convince them of the value of a learning strategy? Part of it may be because they believe an effective learning strategy entails hundreds of hours of work and hundreds of thousands of dollars. They may have visions of dozens of outside

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Competency Models – What Are They Anyhow and What’s the Big Deal?

Posted by Tom Kupetis on

Article Synopsis If you’re in the world of training and workplace learning and performance or HR, there’s no doubt you’ve heard the words “competency” and “competency model” hundreds of times.  Even so, speak to 25 learning or HR professionals and you might get 25 different definitions of a “competency model” and the role it plays

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Learning Content for Millennials – Give Me What I Want

Posted by Tom Kupetis on

Demographics are Shifting If you’re noticing an increase in the number of younger people in the workforce, it’s not just your imagination.   A recent Pew Research Center Article confirms that Millennials are now the nation’s largest living generation.  Millennials are sometimes called Gen Y with ages from 20 -36 and number 75.4 million people, surpassing

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Short Attention Span Theater: Learning in Seconds

Posted by Tom Kupetis on

Attention Span Research There has been a tremendous amount of hoopla related to research conducted by Microsoft to measure the attention span of a group of more than 2,000 Canadians.  This research was first conducted in the year 2000 and the average attention span was twelve seconds.  When the research was conducted again in 2015,

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